Milwaukee VA Medical Center

 

Seeking veterans for play on Women Army Service Pilots

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Women Army Service Pilots of World War II.

Women Army Service Pilots of World War II played a critical role, bringing supplies overseas, and helping male pilots with target practice. We are looking for five men and six women who are enrolled veterans to take on theater roles to bring the WASP story to life.

By Rebecca Omick, Public Affairs staff writer
Saturday, February 4, 2012

 Be a part of a play while learning why a dog’s bite has nothing on a WASP’s sting.

 

History teaches us that a woman’s role in the late 1930s and 1940s wasn’t usually dangerous. And yet, some women were continuously shot at, by choice.

Amongst duties like flying supplies overseas and piloting shuttle planes, the Women Army Service Pilots – better known as WASPs -- of World War II, also served as pilots for target practice. As if stepping out of their skirts and into a pair of pants to fly a plane wasn’t bold enough for these women, they flew around while pulling large targets behind them so military men could practice aiming and shooting.

Sounds completely safe, right? What could possibly go wrong with that plan?


That’s why the Milwaukee VA is looking for a group of men and women to help tell the story.

Jill Feldman, Women’s Resource Center program manager, is looking for enrolled veterans to fill  five male and six female roles for the play, “Censored on Final Approach,” a historically accurate play about the WASPs and their contribution to the war effort. To volunteer or for more information, e-mail Feldman at: Jill.Feldman@va.gov.

The play will show at 2 and 6:30 pm. April 26 at the Milwaukee VA’s Recreation Hall, room 3435, in partnership with the Milwaukee’s Renaissance Theaterworks.

The play is free and open to the public.

The Milwaukee VA Medical Center is located at 5000 W. National Ave.


“It’s a good way for patients to shine or try new things,” Feldman said. “It’s fun.”
Participants must be available to rehearse during the early evenings of April 23 and 25 and on the day of the play. No previous acting experience or line memorization is required.

Feldman encourages people to participate and attend so they can learn about the difficulties women had to overcome just to be accepted in the military.

After each play the audience and actors will be able to participate in a “Talk Back” where they can share their reactions and discuss thoughts about the play.

“It’s important for people to know about WASPs because people don’t really understand who they were or the risks they took,” Feldman said. “They were not actually even considered to be part of the military.”